Fund for Teachers Sends 29 Los Angeles Teachers on Summer Learning Odysseys

National Non‐Profit in Tenth Year of Awarding Grants for Professional Development Experiences

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Educators Experience The Luck of the Irish Through Fund for Teachers Grants

Summer Experiences Bring Ireland Alive For Their Students Across the U.S.

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Ventura County schools celebrate Read Across America Day

Rachel McGrath
Ventura County Star

Adriane Levy brought her three Tennessee fainting goats to school Tuesday in Moorpark as real-life illustrations for the classic Norwegian children’s tale “The Three Billy Goats Gruff.”

Levy, an instructional aide for the Moorpark Unified School District, was taking part in Read Across America Day activities at Arroyo West School.

Read Across America is a nationwide program sponsored by the National Education Association that annually celebrates the March 2, 1904, birthday of the late Theodor Geisel, also known as Dr. Seuss, and is designed to foster a love of books in young children. Schools across Ventura County held events Tuesday, and some are planning activities all week.

“This is a good project and allows everybody to focus on reading, and I really enjoy sharing my experience with the students,” Levy said.

After reading the book, Levy let the children interact with the goats.

“I like it because I’ve never seen a goat before,” said kindergartner Libby Peoples, 5.

“I liked the story and the goats feel real soft,” said Joseph Amezcua-Matthews, 6.

In another classroom, 16-year-old actor Brett Loehr, who has appeared in episodes of TV’s “Hannah Montana,” “Without A Trace” and “Medium,” was reading a book to fifth-graders.

“I love it,” said Loehr, who used to be a student at Arroyo West. “It’s great just coming back to the school and seeing all my old teachers again. I love spending time with kids, and reading is awesome, so it’s great reading stories and stuff to them.”

Arroyo West, with 350 students in grades K-5, has made the literary arts a focus. Thanks to grants from the Fund for Teachers, a national donor-supported organization that helps teachers with professional growth, six Arroyo West teachers attended the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project Institute at Columbia University in New York last summer. Six more have applied for grants to participate this year.

“It’s a balanced literacy program, and the highlight is children reading at their independent reading level,” said Principal Susanne Smith-Stein.

Instead of a class reading the same text at the same time, children now choose their own books and read silently to themselves, said Smith-Stein.

“We see children making great gains in reading, because they’re reading something they like at their level and not reading something too easy or too hard,” she said.

Teacher Irene Garcia, who has attended the summer workshop in New York, said the change is reaping huge dividends.

“We know children who read at their learning level will learn faster, and last year our scores went up tremendously in reading and writing,” she said.

Moorpark sheriff’s Deputy Paul Higgason entertained the students Tuesday with a rendition of the children’s book “Walter the Farting Dog.”

“It’s basically a natural bodily function, and Walter saves the day by stopping criminals from committing crimes by farting,” Higgason said. “I love doing something positive with the kids.”

Click here to listen to the guest readers.

Oklahoma Fellow Gives Unique History Lesson

Darla Splike
The Oklahoman

PONCA CITY – When she was in the eighth grade, Maurisa Pruett asked a friend to join an invitation-only group at their school.

Other group members rejected the girl because of the color of her skin, Pruett said. It was 1978, and segregation was illegal. Pruett got no support from adults she consulted, so she ended up quitting the club.

But the situation changed her outlook.

Now a science teacher at East Middle School in Ponca City, Pruett uses that experience to teach her students about history and civil rights. “My hope is that they will be brave enough to take a stand if they’re ever in a situation that needs that to happen,” the Ponca City teacher said.

During a three- to four-week enrichment class called “Taking a Stand,” Pruett discusses historical movements and contemporary events where courageous individuals made a difference by standing up for what they believed in.

Pruett received a fellowship last summer to visit some of the places about which she teaches. She spent three weeks driving across part of the southern United States. She visited museums and historic sites along the way.

One of the most moving experiences on her trip was when she visited a slave museum and saw cramped quarters where slaves lived, Pruett said.

She said she was appalled by stories she heard about children whose job was to drink water from the rice paddies to make sure no salt was getting through when the paddies were flooded.

Visiting those sites and talking to people who had lived through the history has helped her to connect those experiences to her students in a more dynamic way, Pruett said.

“When you go there and you hear people’s stories, it starts to come to life,” Pruett said. “You feel how humid it was and how miserably hot in the summertime, and yet the people worked from sunup to sundown in terrible conditions.”

Those travel experiences fuel many of her class discussions.

On Friday, Pruett paused a civil rights documentary her eighth-grade students were watching to interject with a story from her summer travels.

She met a man in Birmingham, Ala., who lived there when the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church was bombed, killing four girls in 1963. More than 45 years later, the man still got misty eyes as he recalled the chaos of that day, Pruett said.

Students said the class has been inspiring. “It’s really opened my eyes,” said eighth-grade student Lexi Smith. Smith said the stories make her want to visit some of those historic sites, too. Her classmate, Megan Alexander, agreed.

Alexander said many students at school forget that certain words or actions can be hurtful to others. Pruett’s class is a good reminder, Alexander said.

“I think more people should learn about this, and more people should be thinking about this,” Alexander said.

Fund for Teachers Grant Fuels Film Festival at New York City School

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Newsletter – Volume 6, Spring 2010

In This Issue:
Record Gift Secures Fund for Teachers’ Future
New Board Members
Earth Day Celebration
Reading Revolution

Read our recent newsletter, Odyssey.

 

2009 Houston Fellow Debra Mabery

ABC 13 Houston

NYC Teacher Embarks on Odyssey to Define Her Homeland and Heritage

As “Year of the Tiger” approaches, one NYC teacher explores what it means to “BE Chinese”

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