Grants Now Available for 2014 Summer Learning

National nonprofit tells preK-12 teachers “It’s Your Turn to Learn” — Invites teachers to design unique fellowships that pursue new knowledge and hone skills to advance student achievement. Individuals eligible for grants up to $5,000; teams $10,000.

Houston, TX – October 1, 2013 Teachers committed to expanding their knowledge and increasing student engagement are invited to apply for 2014 Fund for Teachers grants beginning today. These grants allow preK-12 teachers to design and pursue summer learning experiences that meet specific learning gaps – theirs and/or their students’. As a result, teachers (or Fellows) return to classrooms with insights, energy and abilities that directly advance student achievement.

Continue reading the release, here.

Thanking Teachers By Awarding $2 Million in Grants for Summer Fellowships

National nonprofit Fund for Teachers believes the key to improving teacher effectiveness lies in asking what teachers need to improve, then funding their individual growth strategies. For Teacher Appreciation Week, Fund for Teachers distributes $2 million in grants to 500+ teachers to narrow achievement gaps and enhance learning in 350 classrooms across the country.

Across the country this week, gift cards, cookies, bouquets and lattés remind teachers that they matter. National nonprofit Fund for Teachers joins the Teacher Appreciation Week celebration by distributing checks totaling $2 million to more than 500 preK-12 teachers for their self-designed summer fellowships.

2013 Houston Fellows

A complete list of grant winners, along with their fellowship descriptions, is available at fundforteachers.org.

Fund for Teachers’ approach to improving teacher effectiveness involves recognizing and rewarding educators’ innovative ideas for improvement. Instead of applying a top-down, unilateral approach to professional development, Fund for Teachers asks individual teachers what they need to succeed. Teachers annually propose solutions for narrowing achievement gaps – theirs or their students’ – by pursuing new behavioral strategies, instructional techniques, curriculum enhancements or scholarly advancement. Fund for Teachers then supports teachers’ growth plans by funding summer odysseys to locations ranging from hometowns to distant continents.

Since 2001, Fund for Teachers has awarded $20 million in grants to more than 5,000 preK-12 teachers.

“Effective teachers model for their students a growth mindset of inquiry, engagement, and achievement,” said Karen Webb, Fund for Teachers’ executive director. “Fund for Teachers grants represent exemplary educators’ efforts to analyze growth areas, develop strategies for improvement and pursue deeper learning to leverage greater student success.”

When school lets out for the summer, Fund for Teachers grant recipients become the students – conducting field research, volunteering with community organizations, mastering new skills, strengthening command of a subject. Each self-designed fellowship increases teachers’ competency, confidence, and commitment to teaching. Most importantly, these odysseys culminate in broadened perspectives that directly transfer to students, classrooms and school communities.

The online application for 2014 grants is available beginning October 1, 2013. For more information, visit fundforteachers.org.

About Fund for Teachers
Fund for Teachers enriches the personal and professional growth of teachers by recognizing and supporting them as they identify and pursue opportunities around the world that impact their practice, students and school communities.

Teachers in the following locations are currently eligible for Fund for Teachers grants: Alabama, Boston, Chattanooga, Cincinnati, Los Angeles, Louisiana, Minneapolis, Mississippi, Nebraska, New York City, Oakland, Oklahoma, San Francisco, Texas, Washington DC, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Fund for Teachers Awards $2 Million in Grants to 531 Teachers

National nonprofit arms 500+ teachers with opportunities to pursue new knowledge in 280 countries on 7 continents this summer. Literacy workshops in New York City, scientific excursions in the Arctic Circle, volunteer teaching in a Rio de Janeiro favela, language immersion classes in Guatemala and social justice workshops in South Africa among awarded proposals. Meet our 2013 Fellows.

2013 Grant Application Open

Fund for Teachers Grants Encourage Teachers to Pursue Learning Around the World and Inspire Students Back Home

Fund for Teachers’ 2013 grant cycle opened October 1, offering teachers the opportunity to design and experience their idea of professional development. Individuals receive up to $5,000, teaching teams $10,000, to hone skills and seek new knowledge that directly impacts student learning and personal/professional growth.

Read the press release here.

Fund for Teachers Grant Inspires Replication of Lewis & Clark’s Journey

Elementary school teachers use Fund for Teachers grant to retrace explorers’ 7,000 mile cross-country route: Return to create scaled-down version for students in forests behind school; Trails dedicated to fallen war hero prior to Memorial Day. 

Read the press release, here.

2012 Fellowships Announced

May 7, 2012
Fund for Teachers Awards $1.8M in Grants to Teachers Across the Country; Teachers Become Students Again This Summer

FFT & NVPS Offers Grant Challenge

Fund for Teachers – New Visions for Public Schools Offers Grant Challenge to All NYC Public High School Teachers

February 1, 2012 (New York City) – All New York City public high school teachers have some thinking to do: What do they want to learn and where they want to learn it this summer? By crafting their proposal and submitting to Fund for Teachers, they could receive up to $10,000 to make it happen.

The Fund for Teachers – YouPD Challenge Grant is a pilot program extending the traditional Fund for Teachers grant opportunity to all New York City public high school teachers. Since 2003, 600 New Visions for Public Schools teachers received more than $2.6M in Fund for Teachers grants to pursue learning odysseys around the world and engage students in 350 NYC schools.

Read the press release here.

“Made in China” Means More to Cincinnati Teacher After FFT Fellowship

November 30, 2011 (HOUSTON) – The Chinese government censored his blog documenting communism’s impact on citizens. The government also blocked his entry into Tibet, where he hoped to learn more about the contrast between urban and rural daily life. But government constraints ended and authentic learning began when Harvey Lewis, III, returned to his classroom at Cincinnati’s School for Creative and Performing Arts equipped with first-hand experiences from his Fund for Teachers fellowship last June.

After teaching social studies for ten years, Lewis was dissatisfied with students’ “textbook version” of China. He wanted to provide lessons that furthered students’ understanding of, competitiveness against and, ultimately, cooperation with their Chinese counterparts. To do so, he needed to move beyond facts and figures to more authentic learning about China’s government and people. Seeking out and obtaining a $5,000 Fund for Teachers grant, Lewis spent the month of June exploring the economic and political climate in one of the most influential countries on the planet.

Lewis meeting a monk in Mongolia after being denied travel to Tibet; Stopping to visit with a local on his way to Hua Shan Mountain, one of five sacred Taoist mountains.

“My Fund for Teachers fellowship took me by planes, high speed trains, bicycles, boats, camels, and foot across Beijing, Shanghai, Xian, and Mongolia, but speaking with ordinary Chinese about their lives, challenges, and dreams proved to be the most rewarding experiences,” said Lewis. “My goal was to immerse myself in Chinese culture and history to then share the material I collected with students in my government and economics classes. It’s easy to label China as a homogeneous state with government-mandated uniformity. But my photographs, videos, and personal accounts from China are helping students develop a greater appreciation of China’s complex society.”

Lewis’ itinerary included observing schools, interviewing teachers, touring sites, and exploring the architecture and lifestyles of Shanghai’s increasingly affluent middle class. He also visited Yanan to see the headquarters of the Chinese Communist Party from 1936 to 1947, a major Communist pilgrimage destination. After his passport was rejected on the border of Tibet, Lewis cycled through Mongolia to experience the slower paced life characterized by rural farms and Buddhist monasteries.

In addition to daily sharing examples from his odyssey, Lewis also models life-long learning for his students. “Students appreciate the authenticity of first-hand accounts and have evidenced a desire to learn as much as they can from my fellowship,” said Lewis. “I also serve as an example to my students, demonstrating the exciting opportunities available to them by exploring and immersing themselves in another culture.”

Lewis is one of 10 Cincinnati teachers who used approximately $50,000 in Fund for Teachers grants to embark on self-designed learning odysseys last summer as scholars, researchers, and adventurers. Now in its second year of funding teacher grants in the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area in collaboration with Strive Partnership, Fund for Teachers invites all eligible teachers to apply online for 2012 summer grants. The deadline for applications is January 27, 2012.

For more information, visit fundforteachers.org or “like” us on Facebook.