Los Angeles Teacher Confronts South Africa’s History of Apartheid Rule

LOS ANGELES, CA – Almost 20 years ago, Nelson Mandela walked out of Victor Verster Prison and effectively marked the end to Apartheid rule in South Africa. With an education grant from Fund for Teachers, Ariel Neaderthal immersed herself in this culture to take a closer look at the emerging democracy.

This period of racial segregation still strikes a chord with many, particularly during February’s Black History Month, and the teacher grant Ariel designed allowed her to travel to Cape Town to research the history and legacy of Apartheid rule and the challenges still facing the populations of both races. As part of her summer travel, she volunteered with a women’s rights NGO and as an aide in a mixed-race nursing home. This extraordinary experience provided a broad view of the country’s complicated and troubled history, as well as a realistic view of its uncertain yet hopeful future.

Neaderthal commented: “My experience as both tourist-outsider and volunteer-insider allowed me not only to see South Africa as she wished to be seen, but also to uncover what she wished to hide.”

Ariel’s first-hand experience compelled her to augment her school curriculum on discrimination, while also imparted a fresh appreciation of and enthusiasm for the education system in the United States.

Fund for Teachers Executive Director Karen Kovach Webb said: “We empower teachers to decide what they need most, personally or professionally, and then we make those dreams a reality. We believe in the power of teachers to transform learning for themselves, their students and their communities.”

Similar opportunities are available to teachers through the donor-supported Fund for Teachers. Over the last eight years, Fund for Teachers has given $209,241 in teacher grants to 59 teachers in the Los Angeles area and more than $10 million in grants nationwide. In April 2009, the organization will announce its new Fellows who will travel this summer.

Do you know a great teacher who should take advantage of this opportunity? See examples of what other teachers have done with their grants by visiting Fund for Teachers education grants: www.fundforteachers.org.