2015 Boston Fellows Awarded

BPS Teachers Awarded “Golden Ticket” for Summer Learning
32 Teachers from 17 Schools Receive Fund for Teachers Grants for Self-Designed Fellowships

Teachers work both as technicians teaching particular skills and intellectuals developing a love of learning.* Shaping student achievement, both roles need development to remain current and effective. Fund for Teachers annually awards grants to preK-12 educators who address professional learning gaps through self-designed summer fellowships. An inspired educator, Fund for Teachers believes, inspires students.  Today, Fund for Teachers announces its list of 2015 Fellows.

  • In collaboration with BPE, Fund for Teachers awarded grants to 32 teachers from 17 BPS schools.
  • These teachers will embark on summer odysseys spanning the continents of North America, South America and Europe.
  • Topics range from a literacy seminar at Columbia University to biodiversity research in the Amazon and Galapagos Islands.
  • For a complete list of grant recipients and the schools they represent, visit fundforteachers.org.

“My Fund for Teachers grant inspired and empowered me to teach in new ways, bring effective instruction into my classroom and ultimately transformed the academic lives of my young scholars and the school community,” said Shakera Walker, senior manager of Teacher Leadership & Professional Development at Boston Public Schools. “In my current role, I develop and promote learning experiences that validate teachers’ expertise, leadership and professionalism – just as FFT did for me.” (With her FFT grant, Walker interviewed students and staff in Australia’s schools and Council for Educational Research to re-engineer early numeracy instruction that improved math education for economically disadvantaged students.)

Fund for Teachers is one of the largest funders of teacher learning in the country, investing $24 million in more than 6,500 teachers (with $1.4 million to 390 BPS teachers since 2004). For more information about the application process, grant winners or student outcomes, visit fundforteachers.org.

*Center for Public Education, Teaching the Teachers: Effective Professional Development in an Era of High Stakes Accountability, 2013.

2015 Asheville Fellows Awarded

Asheville Teachers Awarded “Golden Ticket” for Summer Learning
Fund for Teachers Awards Four Local Teachers Grants for Self-Designed Fellowships

(HOUSTON) April 2, 2015 – Teachers work both as technicians teaching particular skills and intellectuals developing a love of learning.* To remain effective in both roles, teachers need development and inspiration. Fund for Teachers annually awards grants to preK-12 educators who address professional learning gaps through self-designed summer fellowships. Today, Fund for Teachers announces its list of 2015 Fellows, which includes four local educators:

  • Elizabeth Post (Asheville Middle) will circumnavigate the island of Puerto Rico interviewing experts on and members of the Taino culture to present a less “euro-centric” view of social studies;
  • Donna Marcelo (Asheville Middle) will investigate in the United Kingdom methods used to reduce greenhouse gas emissions while maintaining integrity of the numerous historic buildings to lead students in a study of preservation and progress on a local level;
  • Lauren Jones (Asheville High) will research special education intervention strategies in Lebanon, Greece and Turkey to implement new strategies that better meet the needs of minority students with disabilities in regular education inclusion settings; and,
  • Marin Leroy (Evergreen Community Charter School) will attend the Edible Schoolyard Academy in Berkeley, CA, with subsequent mentored planning time at a K-8 Life Lab garden in Santa Cruz, CA, to strengthen current curriculum and vision future projects alongside garden and kitchen classroom educators from across the nation.
  • For a complete list of grant recipients and the schools they represent, visit fundforteachers.org.

“On my FFT fellowship in Africa last summer, I was curious and inquisitive, experienced problem-based learning, collaborated with people different from myself and immersed myself in a culture very different from my own,” said Patti Evans, teacher at Isaac Dickson Elementary. “I gained a greater appreciation for diversity which will lead to greater tolerance for those who live and think differently from me. I built an understanding of the daily life of school children on the other side of the world and now bring that awareness to my students in a creative authentic way.”

Fund for Teachers is one of the largest funders of teacher learning in the country, investing $24 million in more than 6,500 teachers. For more information about the application process, grant winners or student outcomes, visit fundforteachers.org.

*Center for Public Education, Teaching the Teachers: Effective Professional Development in an Era of High Stakes Accountability, 2013.

2015 Alabama Fellows Awarded

Alabama Teachers Awarded “Golden Ticket” for Summer Learning
Fund for Teachers Awards Grants to 12 Teachers from 5 Alabama Schools for
Self-Designed Fellowships

(HOUSTON) April 2, 2015 – Teachers work both as technicians teaching particular skills and intellectuals developing a love of learning.* Shaping student achievement, both roles need development to remain current and effective. Fund for Teachers annually awards grants to preK-12 educators who address professional learning gaps through self-designed summer fellowships. An inspired educator, Fund for Teachers believes, inspires students. Today, Fund for Teachers announces its list of 2015 Fellows.

  • 12 Alabama teachers representing 5 schools received Fund for Teachers grants.
  • These teachers will embark on summer odysseys spanning North America and Europe.
  • Topics range from a dyslexia seminar in Atlanta to architectural research in Portugal, Spain, France and Switzerland.
  • For a complete list of grant recipients and the schools they represent, visit fundforteachers.org.

“Fairy godmothers grant wishes, Fund for Teachers makes the dreams of teacher’s a reality,” said Lauren Fowler and Gaile Randall, teachers at Thompson Intermediate in Alabaster and Crestline Elementary in Mountain Brook. “The opportunity to explore the richness of the Catalan region and see first-hand the amazing works of innovative artists and architects such as Salvador Dali and Antonio Gaudi has made art explode in our classroom.” With their 2014 FFT grant, these teachers researched the lives and work of unconventional artists in the Catalonia region of Spain and France to inspire innovation and promote problem solving solutions for open-ended, student-centered projects.

Fund for Teachers is one of the largest funders of teacher learning in the country, investing $24 million in more than 6,500 teachers. The national not-for-profit collaborates with Alabama Public Television to administer the grants locally. For more information about the application process, grant winners or student outcomes, visit fundforteachers.org.

*Center for Public Education, Teaching the Teachers: Effective Professional Development in an Era of High Stakes Accountability, 2013.

Newsletter – Volume 11, Spring 2015

Learning that continues beyond the dismissal bell has the potential to change minds and lives. FFT grant recipients featured in this issue apply their new knowledge and skills through classroom curriculum and after-school activities, turning instruction into action through problem-based learning.

Read the latest issue of Odyssey, here.

 
 

Teachers’ journey to Middle East brings powerful lessons to classrooms

Teachers’ journey to Middle East brings powerful lessons to Kansas City classrooms

Original article appears on The Kansas City Star, accessible here.

Posted: Monday, January 5, 2015

By JOE ROBERTSON

By the time they were standing on a Palestinian rooftop in the West Bank, the plans of the three Kansas City teachers had long fled them.

Under a searing sky, they absorbed the sights of patched bullet holes in the water tanks beside them, the razor wire separating the Israeli settlements below, the chilling sniper towers.

They had given up hope of carefully chronicling each day’s journey.

They weren’t settling in at nights the way they had imagined to review the lesson ideas they would be taking home to their students at Alta Vista Charter High School.

This stark view over the city of Hebron was just another backdrop to people they had met — Israeli and Palestinian — whose stories one after the other had burst the teachers’ intellectual and emotional tanks.

“There was so much intensity,” language arts teacher Jay Pitts-Zevin said. “We ran out of bandwidth. How could we capture someone’s story and do justice to it?”

It was all they could do, in exhaustion, to write down as much as possible from their journey lasting a little over a week and bring it home.

To continue reading, click here.

Fund for Teachers Supports Sustainability

Fund for Teachers Supports Sustainability One Teacher at a Time

Original article appears on TriplePundit, accessible here.

Posted: Monday, December 15, 2014

By CARRIE PILLSBURY

Sustainability widely refers to the endurance of products or processes. But for one nonprofit, the term applies to the profession of teaching. Fund for Teachers awards grants for pre-Kindergarten through 12th grade educators to keep them inspired, innovative and in the classroom. How educators choose to spend the national nonprofit’s investment – well, that’s up to them.

To continue reading, click here.

Focus on Teachers: Brooklyn teacher talks about shift to personalized learning

Focus on Teachers: Brooklyn teacher Aaron Kaswell talks about his shift to personalized learning

Original article appears on Impatient Optimists, accessible here.

Posted: Thursday, December 11, 2014

By VICKI PHILLIPS

When I was at the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL) conference last month, I was able to catch up with math teacher Aaron Kaswell from MS 88 Peter Rouget School in Brooklyn, NY.

A year ago, we highlighted Aaron’s and his school’s implementation of New Classroom’s School of One, a blended learning approach that uses daily assessments to customize the next day’s instruction using multiple strategies, including individual online learning, workshops with teachers and problem solving tasks with peers.

At the time, Aaron was a few months into his second year of School of One.  He was eager and pleased to be moving beyond logistical questions of implementation to focusing on ways to use School of One to engage and challenge students at higher levels.

I was interested to hear from Aaron what he had learned from this past year and where he sees School of One heading for his students and co-teachers.

To continue reading, click here.

Newsletter – Volume 10, Holiday 2014

Quoting Albert Einstein, “Peace cannot be kept by force; it can only be achieved by understanding.” In this holiday issue of Odyssey, we highlight the work of Fellows enhancing student understanding through fellowships in Sarajevo, Rome, Hiroshima, Northern Ireland, and Paraguay.

Read the latest issue of Odyssey, here.