Ventura County schools celebrate Read Across America Day

Rachel McGrath
Ventura County Star

Adriane Levy brought her three Tennessee fainting goats to school Tuesday in Moorpark as real-life illustrations for the classic Norwegian children’s tale “The Three Billy Goats Gruff.”

Levy, an instructional aide for the Moorpark Unified School District, was taking part in Read Across America Day activities at Arroyo West School.

Read Across America is a nationwide program sponsored by the National Education Association that annually celebrates the March 2, 1904, birthday of the late Theodor Geisel, also known as Dr. Seuss, and is designed to foster a love of books in young children. Schools across Ventura County held events Tuesday, and some are planning activities all week.

“This is a good project and allows everybody to focus on reading, and I really enjoy sharing my experience with the students,” Levy said.

After reading the book, Levy let the children interact with the goats.

“I like it because I’ve never seen a goat before,” said kindergartner Libby Peoples, 5.

“I liked the story and the goats feel real soft,” said Joseph Amezcua-Matthews, 6.

In another classroom, 16-year-old actor Brett Loehr, who has appeared in episodes of TV’s “Hannah Montana,” “Without A Trace” and “Medium,” was reading a book to fifth-graders.

“I love it,” said Loehr, who used to be a student at Arroyo West. “It’s great just coming back to the school and seeing all my old teachers again. I love spending time with kids, and reading is awesome, so it’s great reading stories and stuff to them.”

Arroyo West, with 350 students in grades K-5, has made the literary arts a focus. Thanks to grants from the Fund for Teachers, a national donor-supported organization that helps teachers with professional growth, six Arroyo West teachers attended the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project Institute at Columbia University in New York last summer. Six more have applied for grants to participate this year.

“It’s a balanced literacy program, and the highlight is children reading at their independent reading level,” said Principal Susanne Smith-Stein.

Instead of a class reading the same text at the same time, children now choose their own books and read silently to themselves, said Smith-Stein.

“We see children making great gains in reading, because they’re reading something they like at their level and not reading something too easy or too hard,” she said.

Teacher Irene Garcia, who has attended the summer workshop in New York, said the change is reaping huge dividends.

“We know children who read at their learning level will learn faster, and last year our scores went up tremendously in reading and writing,” she said.

Moorpark sheriff’s Deputy Paul Higgason entertained the students Tuesday with a rendition of the children’s book “Walter the Farting Dog.”

“It’s basically a natural bodily function, and Walter saves the day by stopping criminals from committing crimes by farting,” Higgason said. “I love doing something positive with the kids.”

Click here to listen to the guest readers.